Some discussion points for Joe Turner’s Come and Gone

First session notes: https://augustwilsonstudygroup.wordpress.com/2018/03/27/some-takeaway-notes-from-joe-turners-come-and-gone/

Second session notes: https://augustwilsonstudygroup.wordpress.com/2018/10/15/notes-joe-turners-come-and-gone-10-14-2018/

Pre-class notes. First, I’d like to draw everybody’s attention to the scenesetter at the beginning, called “The Play.” Gem of the Ocean began with a short prologue that set the stage for the play. Joe Turner opens with a short essay that constructs a framework for an era in time. Gem’s opening prepares us to look backward for guidance, for a message, while postponing the present to a time in the future (Tuesday). Joe Turner’s opening analyses the present and sets forth future options. If you get the chance, please compare the two for discussion.

We learn some things in Scene 1. Seth is a landlord and an owner, the son of free blacks, and a craftsman. He has little regard for Bynum’s “heebie-jeebie stuff,” i.e., African/southern spiritual traditions. He reminds me a bit of Caesar Wilks, he has little patience with what he considers backwardness.

Bynum, based on his description in the play notes, is essentially a Stoic. He is not bothered by outward appearances of things. He tends to his garden and completes his daily rituals centered in nature, whose practice, we later learn, he has inherited from his father. The first interaction in the play is between Bynum and Seth, the traditional vs. the proto-modern, moderated by Bertha, Seth’s wife, who straddles both worlds.

Selig, introduced in Gem of the Ocean as a trader, gets identified racially in Scene 1. We assumed his race in Gem from his name and mannerisms – now we know for certain. Selig buys manufactured housewares from Seth wholesale, then peddles them retail to the public. From his retail work, door to door, Selig knows where people are located and becomes known as a People Finder. Bynum is looking for a shiny man and solicits Selig’s assistance. From their dialogue, we learn the details of Bynum’s vision.

We meet ne’er-do-well Jeremy. We meet Loomis and Zonia and Mattie and Reuben. Jeremy is looking for love, Mattie is looking for lost love, Loomis is looking for Martha, his wife and Zonia, her mother. Selig, the People Finder is ready to help. That’s a lot of action for one scene, but it sets the framework for the rest of the play.

There are some interesting repetitive occurrences in the play and between Joe Turner and Gem. Seth says seven times words to the effect that something is not right about Loomis. Seven times! Jeremy hangs out with Roper Lee, and Citizen Barlow hung out with a Roper Lee earlier in Gem. Loomis makes a reference to tongues on fire when he comes in during the Juba and Citizen Barlow sees people with tongues on fire in the City of Bones.

While Loomis appears to be the star of the ensemble, it is Bynum who, in discovering his Shiny Man (Loomis), achieves transcendence and completion. At best, then, Loomis is Best Supporting Actor to Bynum’s Best Actor, in my estimation.

I may add to this before Friday. And I’ll post post-class notes after class.

More discussion points – Joe Turner’s Come and Gone

  1. Largest ensemble cast of any Wilson play. 12 counting the ever-present Joe Turner, 15 with appearance of Miss Mabel, plus the unseen Eugene, plus Jack Carper
  2. Said to be Wilson’s favorite play in the cycle. Based on Bearden painting, Mill Hand’s Lunch Bucket
  3. Herald Loomis is the Wilson Warrior, but Bynum and Bertha play significant supporting roles (not so sure about this anymore. In fact, the reverse. Let’s discuss.)
  4. Themes that recur:
  • Blood as a means of cleansing, baptism, lifting the veil.
  • Finding one’s song is finding one’s voice, discovering a sense of agency.
  • The relationship between Bynum’s Shiny Man, called One Who Goes before and Shows the Way, a sort of First Man, and Loomis’s first name, Herald, i.e., a messenger, a sign that something is about to happen.
  • Selig, the white “trader.” Buys and sells pots (sustenance, basic necessity) and finds lost people (only because he carried them away in the first place). (Martha started at the Holly house and was carried away by Selig. That is why Loomis said he could smell her there and knew she wasn’t dead)
  • Bynum’s spirituality helps people, but still doesn’t give him his song completely, until he witnesses the return of the Shiny Man who self-baptizes.

       5. Play Structure

  • Exposition: Scene 1: the boardinghouse; Bynum’s spirituality; Seth’s superiority complex; Selig, the trader
  • Rising action: Arrival of Herald Loomis, Seth’s distrust.
  • Climax: End of Scene 1. The Juba dance scene, Loomis’s disapproval and the performance of his own “act” within and via the old slave and minstrel celebration, aided by Bynum.
  • Falling action: Seth’s growing distrust and decision to evict Loomis; the Mollie/Mattie/Jeremy love triangle.
  • Resolution: Loomis fails to romance Mattie; future prospects for Reuben and Zonia; Loomis departs the House (but we feel him watching from a distance)
  • Denouement: Martha Loomis returns to the House and reunites with Zonia; Loomis self-baptizes and self delivers; Bynum sees Shiny Man (in Loomis) and finds his agency at last.

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