August Wilson Festival – Designers Panel: Building the World of August Wilson

(Note: Wrote this for my poetry group. More details to follow for August Wilson aficionados).

Morning coffee. Trader Joe’s Ethiopian. Got something called Lifeboost on order. Report to follow . . .

Last night my wife and I attended the first of several events marking 70 years of operation of Arena Stage in Washington, DC. Long story short, Arena Stage, a venue for plays, readings, performing arts, and most recently, really interesting civic discussions, came into existence at a time in the city’s history when there were two performing arts venues. One allowed blacks to perform on stage but they couldn’t attend performances and sit in the audience. The other allowed blacks to attend and sit in the audience but they couldn’t perform on the stage. Won’t go into names since both venues still exist, but it was a real mess. Such was the design of American-styled apartheid. Some civic-minded folks from both sides got together and Arena Stage was born, allowing both performance and attendance by all segments of society.

And there is a second tie in for me. To commemorate 70 years, Arena Stage is doing what they call a Giants series, featuring the works of playwrights whose work has been performed most often there. And at the top of the list is my favorite playwright, a former poet of note, whose series of plays I have been “teaching” in the ModPo sense and mode for the past two years, though face-to-face and not online, the bard from Pittsburgh, August Wilson.

Last night’s lecture/discussion focused on stage and set design and featured an expert in actually building the set, and expert in composing music to accompany the plays, and an expert in costume design (who just happens to be the widow of August Wilson and the executor of his estate). Amazing discussion about these pieces of a dramatic production that sort of sit in the background while we focus on the play’s performance, and yet have a far-reaching effect on developing the whole work of art. 

Thursday there will be a discussion of food and cooking in the ten-play series that covers each decade in the 20th century, aptly called the American Century Cycle.

By this time, you may be rolling your eyes. Relax, it is just coffee talk! 

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